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Pontotoc Ridge Preserve

Pontotoc/Johnston County

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This account from the Nature Conservancy Web Site.


Pontotoc Ridge Preserve is the Oklahoma Chapter's premier crosstimbers property. This 2,900-acre landscape rests in south-central Oklahoma and holds bottomland forests, oak savannas (essential for migratory birds like painted buntings), mixed-grass and tallgrass prairies, springs and cool running streams. This untilled landscape has proven to be a regional hot spot of butterfly diversity, boasting over 90 species documented at the preserve to date. Whether it's cactus, bluestem or mountain boomers, Pontotoc Ridge Preserve is an excellent example of Oklahoma's ruggedly beautiful lands. The original property that formed the preserve was a gift from the Buddy Smith family.


Prescribed burn at Pontotoc Ridge

Anonymous

Biodiversity Threats in the area include the spread of eastern redcedars. Much of the surrounding area is succumbing to this invasive species. Completing the acquisition of several critical parcels of land inside the preserve boundary will help secure the natural integrity of this immensely diverse landscape.

What the Conservancy is doing now currently centers around prescribed burning. Fire was a naturally occurring event in this ecosystem, yet landowners and communities have shied away from conducting prescribed burns due to the lack of training and equipment and burdensome prescribed burning laws in our state. In the spring of 2003, the Conservancy conducted the first-ever prescribed burn workshop at the preserve for area landowners with help from fire ecology experts from Oklahoma State University. Bringing people and equipment together to put this powerful land management tool back to use will play a key role in managing this fire-dependent landscape.


Click here or on map for full PDF version

 

 

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Copyright 2009 Tulsa Audubon Society
Last modified: September 21, 2009

 

 

 

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