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Pathfinder Parkway

Washington County

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This account excerpted from parkway web site in 2007.
New account by Melinda Droege coming soon!


Whether you start from the Johnstone Park entrance in downtown Bartlesville, from Sooner Park on the east side of the City, or any of many other entrances, you are in for a treat when exploring the Pathfinder. Its 12 miles of trail wander through the deepest woods, along a river -all right through the middle of town! From Johnstone Park the Path follows the Caney River and passes by the City's water treatment plant, past the Girl's Softball field and then dips under two highway bridges, all the time winding through deep woods. Instantly you'll feel you are miles from any town. Look closely, because hidden in these woods are plentiful deer, raccoons, beaver, rabbits, opossums, fox, coyotes and skunks!


Section of Parkway

Anonymous

A walk along the Pathfinder can be a revitalizing experience for those stressed by their busy lives. In the quiet woods, bird's songs and nature envelope you, and tranquility can permeate your mind! And notice, some travelers on the Path are using it to get from one section of Bartlesville to another -avoiding ALL traffic!

In 1996, the George Miksch Sutton Avian Research Center in Bartlesville proposed a Bird Trail be added to a portion of the Pathfinder Parkway. The trail started with the addition of two entrance signs, one at Jo Allyn Lowe Park, and the other at the Pathfinder access point behind the Senior High School, known as the Jackson Tract.


Sign on Bird Trail

Anonymous

Phillips Petroleum then donated $19,400 for the cost of ten signs that were placed at selected locations between those two points. Sutton Avian Research created the signs, identifying birds that could actually be seen and heard on the Path. Take your binoculars and walk slow!

 

 

 

 

 

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Copyright 2009 Tulsa Audubon Society
Last modified: September 21, 2009

 

 

 

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