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A Guide to Birding in Oklahoma

Click here for a Quick Index to the area accounts


Background

Tulsa Audubon's A Guide to Birding in Oklahoma was first published in 1973, with a second edition in 1986. Both are now out of print.

We may again publish a revised edition, but for now have decided to make the information available here on our web site, updating and adding accounts as needed. Most include the original maps drawn by Byron Ball, and these have been supplemented with the latest mapping technologies, particularly Google Maps and Google Earth.

Updates

Each of the print editions was a collaborative effort of many birders throughout the state. It was the only statewide birding guide ever published.

I hope birders around Oklahoma will again contribute updates to these accounts, providing both local and visiting birders an important resource in planning their birding activities. With the Internet we can have a truly up-to-date guide that will not go out of print.

Being recently digitized and updated, there are undoubtedly many errors, bad links, etc. Please email me any corrections, updates or additions. If you know of an area that should be included, let me know. Or better yet, volunteer to write up a description!

I have added many new areas from around Tulsa, but I especially want to include more areas outside of Tulsa, and for that I need everyone's suggestions and help. Thanks!

John Kennington,
Editor, Online Edition

Table of Contents

Recent Updates to the Guide

Introduction to the new on-line edition

Foreword to 1st Edition by George Miksch Sutton

Prefaces/Acknowledgements (from 1973 & 1986 editions)

Birding in Oklahoma (from 1986 edition)

Use one of the map options below which contain
links to the detailed area accounts.
OR
Click here for a Quick Index to each area
OR
Scroll down for a complete index of areas with a brief description and links to the detailed area accounts
OR
Click the following links to jump to a
specific section of the below index

Tulsa County and Vicinity

Oklahoma City Area

Northwest Oklahoma

Northeast Oklahoma

Southwest Oklahoma

Southeast Oklahoma

Outside Oklahoma

Is This Really Free?

Yes! But the print edition of A Guide to Birding in Oklahoma also served as a fund raiser for the Society. Since we are now making this information freely available, if you find this guide useful please consider making a small donation. You may do so online, or by mail to Tulsa Audubon, P.O. Box 2476, Tulsa, OK 74101. Thank You!

 

Locator Maps

Good Better Best!

Locator maps of the Tulsa Area, Olahoma City/Norman Area, and the State of Oklahoma showing locations of birding areas. Click on location names to go to detailed account.

Tip: These are not external links, so they load fast and are good for dial-up Internet users.
Tip: These maps do not allow zooming in to see the location close-up, but most of the detailed accounts have close-up detailed maps included.

View birding areas in Google Maps, showing all locations statewide. You can zoom in or out on any area of the state. Click on balloons or names on left for a brief description and a link to detailed area account.

Tip: This will open a local page with two embedded Google Maps. You will have the option to open the map directly in Google Maps.

View birding areas in Google Earth, showing all locations statewide. You can zoom in or out on any area of the state. Click on map below and then choose "open" to launch in Google Earth.

Tip: You must have Google Earth, which is free, installed on your computer (click here for info). It requires high speed internet.

Tip: Unlike Google Maps, Google Earth will display all 130 or so places at once, and show the name next to the placemarker.

 

Index of Birding Areas

Tulsa County and Vicinity    Oklahoma City Area    Northwest Oklahoma    Northeast Oklahoma
Southwest Oklahoma    Southeast Oklahoma    Outside Oklahoma

Tulsa County and Vicinity

Location

Description

56 St. N. Sod Farm The sod farms can be good after rain in any season. The best time is spring thru the fall after a rain. Many shorebird species, waders and Waterfowl could be present. Yellow Headed Blackbirds and Bobolinks have been found there and across the street in the spring. Click here for a detailed description and map
56 St. N. Sewage Pond Sewage Lagoon and drying beds create mud flats attractive to marsh and shore birds. The plant at 56 St. North offers access to six large ponds separated by graveled dikes. Birds move from one pond to another and are both visible and vocal. During working hours the gate is usually open and one can enter the enclosure with permission. Click here for a detailed description and map
Apache Sewage Pond

These are two small retention pond with marshy areas.  It is good for ducks and shorebirds, and other birds seen here include Least Tern, Common Moorhen, Least Bittern, American Bittern, Sora, Virginia Rail, Yellow-crowned Night Heron. It is fenced and there is no public access.  However, there is a wide road shoulder to pull over.  You can see much of the area standing by the fences or standing in the back of a pickup offers a better view.  There is a lot of truck traffic, be sure to pull well off the road. Click here for a detailed description and map

Bird Creek Flood Plain, Skiatook This is a route through a varied habitat of open grasslands, brushy fields, and wooded areas that include riparian woodlands of Bird Creek, the principal drainage of northwestern Tulsa County. Extensive grasslands, part of large ranches, are accessible only from the roads and a spotting scope is required for bird identification in most locations. Land use in the Skiatook area also includes a Christmas tree farm. Click here for a detailed description and map
Bixby River Park See Washington Irving Park
Bixby Sod Farms The Bixby and Leonard and other area sod farms, which are periodically irrigated or flooded by over-night rains, bringing down great numbers of shorebirds in spring and fall migration. Notable species are Black­bellied Plover, Whimbrel, Hudsonian and Marbled godwits, Sanderlings, Dunlin, phalaropes, peeps, and occasionally large numbers of Buff-breasted Sandpipers. Click here for a detailed description and map
Caney River Bottoms One of many tributaries of the Caney River subject to periodic flooding, with many pecan groves, river & bottomland habitat. Located in the area of 176th St. N. & 129 E. Ave. Click here for a detailed description and map
Chandler Park The 270 acre county park can be reached from the east by driving west fro Tulsa across either the 11 St. bridge or the 21 St. bridge. The park consists of wooded rocky bluffs, open areas, grassy meadows and woods. It provides an excellent view of the Arkansas River. Updrafts bring vultures and hawks directly overhead. Click here for a detailed description and map
Collinsville Sewage Pond Sewage Lagoon and drying beds (mud flats.) Located at 129th E. Ave. between 156 St. N. and 166 St. N. See Caney River Bottoms
Cowskin Bay, Keystone Lake See Keystone Lake
Coyote Trail & Prattville Sewage Ponds This is a driving or car-birding route located in western Tulsa County. The approximate length of the trip is twenty miles and one should allow three hours to complete it with stops at some of the important birding spots. Habitat is varied, ranging from open fields to wooded oak hillsides, good fence rows, streams and a few ponds. It is a good route at any time of the year. Click here for a detailed description and map
Creek Turnpike Wetland Wetland along the Creek Turnpike. The gate is locked and special permission is needed to enter.
Double Creek Marsh and Mudflat, Oologah Lake On a good day everything seen on the Winganon mud flats can be found here plus rails, bitterns, and an occasional White-faced Ibis. There are always a good many songbirds in the woods and on the hillside. In deep winter Bald Eagles are seen from here looking toward the dead trees to the southeast. Click here for a detailed description and map
Feyodi Park, Keystone Lake A state park on bay of Keystone Lake, with  mudflats and wetlands. There is a wooded area overlooking the mudflats near Judy Ann's restaurant near the park entrance. See Keystone Lake
Garden Center The Tulsa Garden Center is a large, Italian style mansion now owned by the City of Tulsa. It is adjacent to Woodward Park and the municipal rose garden and is where TAS meetings are held. East of the building is an arboretum containing 270 trees and shrubs which grow in Oklahoma. See Woodward Park for details
Gilcrease Museum Grounds/Stuart Park

Besides the impressive collection of American art and Remingtons, for the birders the attraction is the grounds and the adjacent Stuart Park. This area was once savannah grassland sprinkled with trees. Today, although the terrain is varied, this is predominantly a woodland with interspersed grassland and prairie habitats. A trail leads past two small ponds into a natural area.  Click here for a detailed description and map

Haikey Creek Park This large county park on 121 St. S. and Garnett Rd. is an excellent place to find many woodland and thicket birds. In the northwest corner of the park the thorny undergrowth provides excellent habitat for sparrows and juncos. The many large Pecan Trees attract woodpeckers. A walking trail through the heavily wooded eastern part of the park is an excellent place for birds, especially Pileated Woodpecker and Bared Owls. Click here for a detailed description and map
Hawthorne Bluff, Oologah Lake Along the trails at Hawthorne Bluff during spring migration some of the rarest warblers in Oklahoma have been seen: Golden-winged, Swainson's, Black-throated Blue, Connecticut, Cerulean, and Worm-eating. Warblers seen there regularly throughout most of the migration are Tennessee, Kentucky, Wilson's, Nashville, Black-and-white, Yellow-breasted Chat, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow, and Orange-crowned. Click here for a detailed description and map
Hominy Creek-Bird Creek Drainage The Hominy Creek-Bird Creek drainage in northwestern Tulsa County is extensive and the bottomlands support a wide variety of deciduous growth and bird life. Sperry Lake supports a variety of water and marsh birds. Click here for a detailed description and map
Indian Springs Sports Complex This 84 acre park is in Broken Arrows on 145 E. Ave, one -half mile south of 131 St. S. Much of the park consists of soccer and baseball fields. But the park in on the bank of the Arkansas River and provides a good view up and down the river, and there is a heavily wooded creek area on the east side. Bald Eagles and Least Terns can be seen along the river, as well as shorebirds and open country birds. Click here for a detailed description
Keystone Lake This large lake just west of Tulsa provides many varied habitats. In recent years many rare Gulls, Terns and other water birds have been found, and there are many excellent shorebird areas, provided the water levels are low enough. The surrounding countryside also hosts a wide variety of land birds. Click here for a detailed description and map
LaFortune Park This is a large urban park on Yale Ave. between 51 St. S. and 61 St. S. A heavily used walking path through wooded and park areas surrounds a golf course. Click here for a detailed description
Lake Yahola See Oxley Nature Center/Mohawk Park
Leonard Sod Farms The Bixby and Leonard and other area sod farms, which are periodically irrigated or flooded by over-night rains, bringing down great numbers of shorebirds in spring and fall migration. Notable species are Black­bellied Plover, Whimbrel, Hudsonian and Marbled godwits, Sanderlings, Dunlin, phalaropes, peeps, and occasionally large numbers of Buff-breasted Sandpipers. Click here for a detailed description and map
Lynn Lane Reservoir This reservoir is and excellent compact site to observe and identify waterbirds at relatively close range. Click here for a detailed description and map
Mannford Ramp, Keystone Lake  See Keystone Lake
Memorial Park Cemetery This large cemetery is located at the southeastern corner of 52 St. S. and Memorial Dr. The cemetery has many large trees, both deciduous and evergreen. Two small streams flow through the western section and are lined with large trees and low brush which provide excellent habitat for birds. Click here for a detailed description and photos
Midland Valley Trail & Pedestrian Bridge The pedestrian Bridge allows views of waterbirds and Least Terns on the Arkansas Rive, and from the east end of the bridge the path goes north and east past a meadow, original bottomland woods, and hedgerows. The path is on an embankment part of the way as one walks almost at tree-top level, a great vantage point for finding warblers, vireos, and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks in spring. Click here for a detailed description and map
Mingo Trail A multiuse trail along US 169 and Mingo Creek under construction that will link the existing Creek Turnpike Trail at 96th Street and Memorial Drive to Mohawk Park to the north. Phase I is complete, starting at the City of Tulsa Nelson Detention Site (E. 26th Street South) and running along the west side of Mingo Creek, ending just south of 11th Street, adjacent to South 93rd Avenue. Click here for a detailed description
North Prairie The high prairies of northern Tulsa County offer some of the best prairie birding in northeastern Oklahoma. The adjacent bottomlands to the east and west create a large diversity of habitat and related bird species. The area is roughly found from 96th St. N to 166th between US 75 and US 169.  Click here for a detailed description and map
Oologah Lake When Oologah Reservoir is down at least one foot below normal, which is usually in late summer, shorebirds are seen by the dozens scattered around the mud bars at Winganon Flats, Double Creek and other areas around the lake. Shorebird season is from mid-July to early November with waves occurring from mid-August to mid-September, depending on the weather. Spring shorebirding is just as exciting as fall but less dependable because of high lake levels covering the bars. Along the trails at Hawthorne Bluff and other wooded areas during spring migration some of the rarest warblers in Oklahoma have been seen. Click here for a detailed description and map
Osage Point, Keystone Lake See Keystone Lake
Osage Prairie Trail The Osage Prairie Trail extends from downtown Tulsa, through Sperry and ending at Highway 20 in Skiatook. The area of particular interest to birders stretches from Sperry to 76 Street North. The trails passes through a variety of woodland and grassland habitats. About half way between 86 St. N. and Main street in Sperry (98 St. N.) is a wetlands area where American Bittern have been found. Click here for a detailed description and map
Oxley Nature Center/Mohawk Park

Mohawk Park was created in 1927 as a nature park, and this 2800 acre park has long been noted for its bird life.  Within the boundaries of the park are a golf course, Lake Yahola, Lake Sherry, and Oxley Nature Center.

The Mary K. Oxley Nature Center, in the northeast section of Mohawk Park, is the birding hub of Mohawk Park. It contains a wooded lakes, small prairie areas, a marsh with a boardwalk, hardwood groves and Bird Creek bottomlands.

Lake Yahola - On the western edge of Mohawk Park, Lake Yahola is the traditional starting place for birders going into the park of other areas in Northern Tulsa County.

Lake Sherry - Small lake that is part of Oxley Nature Center.

Blackbird Marsh - part of Oxley Nature center features a boardwalk and an observation tower overlooking Lake Sherry.

North Woods - In the northwest corner of Mohawk Park, this is a mature oak-hickory wood with excellent birding year round. 

Click here for detailed information about Oxley and links to trail maps

Philbrook Gardens Located at 27 St. S. and Rockford Ave.,  Philbrook museum is an elegant Italian renaissance mansion that was given as an art museum in 1938 by the Phillips family. behind the museum formal terraced Italian gardens slope down to Crow Creek. Many large deciduous trees shading spacious lawns and shrubs, providing excellent habitat for birds, especially warblers and vireos. Click here for a detailed description
Plaza Track Park This little known park has some great birding opportunities. The open trees next to the parking lot are good for Warblers and migrants in the spring and fall. Go west from the parking lot and cross a small stream to the main trail network. These trails are good for Acadian Flycatchers, Louisiana Waterthrushes, Kentucky Warblers and other deep wooded birds. Follow the trails up the hill and it opens up to open Woodlands. Painted Buntings, Yellow Breasted Chats and Field Sparrows are some off the birds you will find in this area.  Click here for a detailed description

Prattville Sewage Ponds

See Coyote Trail & Prattville Sewage Ponds

Prettywater Road Route This route through west Tulsa County winds through hilly, wooded areas with meadows and open fields. Logger­head Shrikes, Eastern Bluebirds, Blue Grosbeaks, Dickcissels, Eastern Kingbirds, and Lark and Field sparrows are common in this area in summer. The road passes several small stream and pond and the upper reaches of Sahoma Lake. Click here for a detailed description and maps
Ray Harrall Nature Park Located in Broken Arrow behind a school, this is a deeply wooded area with a creek and pond with a marshy area, with an extensive stand of horsetail. Warblers, vireos and thrushes are common in migration. Click here for a detailed description, photos and maps
Redbud Valley Redbud Valley is a place of quiet beauty and rugged scenery. Here are plants and animals found nowhere else in northeastern Oklahoma. Bird Creek has cut through this area creating tall limestone cliffs, providing habitat for Columbine and Dutchman's Breeches to grow, and it shelters native Oklahoma Sugar Maples. At the top of the limestone cliffs the soil is thin and dries quickly, allowing plants like yucca and two species of cactus to flourish.  One tree of interest found here is the Smoke Tree, Cotinus obovatus. The combination of the dry and moist habitats, existing side by side, gives Redbud Valley its special character. Click here for a detailed description, photos and maps
River Parks River Parks extends from 11St. S. to 101 St. S. between Riverside Drive and the Arkansas River on the east and along a shorter area on the west bank. Parking is available at several locations along Riverside Drive. A jogging/biking trail extends the entire length of the park. The river in this area provides sandbars and barren beaches of gravel and sand used by the Interior Least tern as nesting habitat. The terns arrive mid-May, leave their nesting areas in mid July and depart the area in late August - early September. The Terns nest on the river on Zink Island at 15th Street. Good observation points are at 15th St., 31st St. and south of 81st St. Click here for a detailed description and map
Skiatook Bird Creek Flood Plain This is a route through a varied habitat of open grasslands, brushy fields, and wooded areas that include riparian woodlands of Bird Creek, the principal drainage of northwestern Tulsa County. Extensive grasslands, part of large ranches, are accessible only from the roads and a spotting scope is required for bird identification in most locations. Land use in the Skiatook area also includes a Christmas tree farm. Click here for a detailed description and map
Skiatook Sewage Ponds See Skiatook Bird Creek Flood Plain
South Elwood Route

Starting at Turkey Mountain, there is a lovely view of the valley as the road head. Water birds from the Arkansas River may be see flying over. Open fields, wooded areas, ponds and creeks alternate along this route, and Dickcissels, Eastern Meadowlarks, Common and Great-tailed grackles, and Eastern Bluebirds are found in summer. Field Sparrows are here all year, Tree Sparrows in winter. Click here for a detailed description and map

South Loop Trail Wetlands, Broken Arrow This wetlands remediation area is some of the most accessible wetlands in south Tulsa County. The area of interest to birders is at the northwest corner of 101st St. (aka New Orleans Ave in Broken Arrow) and Garnett Road. Egrets, Great Blue Herons and other water birds are found throughout the spring, summer and fall. Sora have also been found here. During migration the exposed mudflats attract a variety of shorebirds, and along the wooded edges the expected land bird species are common. Click here for a detailed description and map
South Peoria Route This route begins at the town of Jenks, going south on Elm past a sod farm on the left where shorebirds are found after late spring rains. Watch the woods on the right for woodpeckers, orioles, chickadees, and titmice. The residential area gives way to open fields just beyond the woods. Dickcissels, Scissor-tailed Fly­catchers, Horned Larks, and hawks are prevalent. The oil tank farm on the right is often a good place to find Lark Sparrows in summer.  Click here for a detailed description and map
Spencer Bluff, Oologah Lake See Winganon Flats, Oologah Lake. Click here for a detailed description and map
Sperry Lake The Hominy Creek-Bird Creek drainage in northwestern Tulsa County is extensive and the bottomlands support a wide variety of deciduous growth and bird life. Sperry Lake supports a variety of water and marsh birds. Click here for a detailed description and map
Swan Lake Swan Lake is located in a fine, older residential part of Tulsa The small lake is centered by a fountain. It is entirely fenced and surrounded by a one-way street with residences on steep hillsides to the north and south. Park personnel keep many species of waterfowl here. It is a great place to study waterfowl at very close range, but you must be careful to distinguish the pinioned waterfowl from the wild birds that join them. Click here for a detailed description
Turkey Mountain Park

The Turkey Mountain area of Tulsa is a ridge along the west bank of the Arkansas River. The parking lot is located on Elwood Avenue, between 61st and 71st Streets. Click here for a detailed description and map

Walnut Creek, Keystone Lake See Keystone Lake
Washington Irving Park (Bixby River Park) This park features a bottomland hardwood forest habitat and is home to a wide variety of birds and other wildlife. The Yellow-throated Warbler is one particular species that can easily be found in the park. Its location adjacent to both the Arkansas River and the sod farms also increases the diversity of bird species seen at the park. Click here for a detailed description
Williams Center Green The Williams Center Green is a small one-block park in the heart of downtown Tulsa that often serves a migrant trap. You can get excellent looks at the birds downtown as they are usually at eye level or lower. The Green is located in downtown Tulsa between 2nd and 3rd Streets, just north of where Boston Avenue ends. A partial list of recent sightings, from recent spring and fall migration, includes: American Woodcock, Sora, Virginia & Yellow Rail, Common Poorwill, Chuck-will's-widow, Whip-poor-will, Yellow Warbler, American Redstart, Ovenbird, Northern Waterthrush, Mourning Warbler, Yellow-breasted Chat, Nashville Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Ovenbird, Magnolia Warbler, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. Click here for a detailed description and map
Winganon Flats, Oologah Lake When Oologah Reservoir is down at least one foot below normal, which is usually in late summer, shorebirds are seen by the dozens scattered around the mud bars of this entire peninsula. Shorebird season is from mid-July to early November with waves occurring from mid-August to mid-September, depending on the weather. Spring shorebirding is just as exciting as fall but less dependable because of high lake levels covering the bars. Click here for a detailed description and map
Woodward Park & Tulsa Garden Center This park contains very large, mature deciduous trees, mostly oaks. Birding here is excellent all year but can be spectacular during migration, especially for warblers and vireos. Click here for a detailed description and map
Zink Island This man-made island in Zink Lake is used by the endangered Interior Least Tern for nesting. The island may be observed from the River Parks area near 15th Street, which features a bench dedicated to the late Fred Pianalto, a Tulsa Audubon member who first publicized the Least Terns on the River and was known as the "Birdman of River Parks". Click here for a detailed description and map
Zink Park Located at 31 St. S. and Rockford Ave, Zink Park occupies only a city block. On the west side of the park is a massive sandstone bluff and creek with many tall trees providing excellent habitat for a variety of birds. Click here for a detailed description
Zink Ranch A large ranch, north of Sand Springs, including areas of Skiatook Lake. Extensive prairie and woodland areas. Entry is by permission only

 

Oklahoma City/Norman Area

Oklahoma City is centrally located within the state and visiting birders will find that all resident and nesting species are also found in much of the eastern half of Oklahoma. Because of habitat differences and geographic distribution, however, many species found in eastern Oklahoma normally do not occur here. A checklist of "Birds of the Oklahoma City Area" which indicates the season when birds are present is available from the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation in Oklahoma City.

Location

Description

Arcadia Lake Arcadia Lake is located east of I-35 in Edmond, Oklahoma. It is a water supply and recreational lake, and the lake, parks and camping areas are all fee-based ($6 per day / per car). Birding is very good on and around the lake during any season. Click here for a detailed description and map
Bridgestone Preserve

This land was recently donated to Oklahoma City by Bridgestone for use as a nature preserve, with adjacent land for a new school. There is a nice wide trail along a tree lined creek from a grassy parking area at the corner of SW 15th. It generally runs east-west and goes about 2/3 to 3/4 of a mile east to the sand company on the east end. There are several footbridge crossings and several picnic tables along the trail. About a half mile in there is a trail that heads south up a small embankment. There is a fair size pond with small willows and cottonwoods around it.  Click here for a detailed description and map

Crystal Lake A small 60 acre city owned lake used as a special fishing area in the western Oklahoma City area. Cattail marshes are located at the NW and SW corners of the lake. Fields and brushy areas surround the lake with a wooded area on west side.  Click here for a detailed description and map
Eldon Lyon Park A well maintained 60-acre walking park with paved paths throughout, located two blocks west of Rockwell Avenue on 36th Street. Primarily mature oak trees, some sycamore elm, pine and a grove of honey locusts. The park is surrounded by mature trees on three sides with large open spaces centrally located. Click here for a detailed description and map
Fort Reno

Historic Fort Reno was a military post from 1875 through 1947 and parts are being restored for historic reenactments. much of the 7,000 acres is an agricultural research station. The Fort's visitor center and main gate are open Monday - Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and holidays / weekends from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Only the main road, main compound, cemetery road and cemetery are open to the public. Please do not cross fences or enter locked gates without permission. The unofficial bird list for Fort Reno, updated as of 6-24-2006, stands at 170 species. Click here for a detailed description and map

Goldsby Sod Farms Coming Soon
Lake Hefner This is a gathering place for grebes, ducks and gulls from fall through winter and during early spring migrations. Most species of ducks common to Oklahoma are found here during migration. Unusual ones have been Oldsquaw, White-winged Scoter, and Surf Scoter. Common Loons, Red-throated Loons several times, Horned, Eared, and Pied-billed grebes, the rarely noted Western Grebe, and multitudes of coots arrive with the ducks. Click here for a detailed description and map
Lake Overholser This lake has the waterbirds similar to Lake Hefner, and also has an extensive cattail marsh at its north end which extends north across US 66 for about 0.5 mile. Nesting species have included King Rails, Common Gallinules, Pied-billed Grebes, and Least Bitterns. The various herons and egrets feed here in numbers. The marsh attracts thousands of roosting blackbirds in late summer and fall. Click here for a detailed description and map
Martin Park Nature Center

The city-owned Martin Park Nature Center. This 140-acre tract is largely grasslands, drained by three generally all-weather streams. These streams are bordered by a natural growth of mature and second growth trees and brush attractive to migrating and nesting land birds and to wintering birds. The interpretive building houses informative exhibits maintained by the staff for teaching adults and youngsters about the local wildlife. A series of hiking trails leading through the various habitats acquaints the visitors with some of the exciting discoveries beyond our dooryards. Click here for a detailed description and map

Mitch Park

Mitch Park is a 133-acre park which features several play-grounds, sports fields and other facilities. The city of Edmond has done a fine job landscaping with native vegetation the birds and wildlife seem to thrive on. Throughout the park are benches and feeding stations where you can sit and enjoy the birds. The majority of the trails are paved and a newly-opened trail bridge opened during the winter of 2005. This new bridge is a great area to observe the Louisiana Waterthrush during the summer months. Click here for a detailed description and map

Myriad Botanical Garden The Myriad Gardens are a welcome oasis in the middle of downtown Oklahoma City for migrating birds. The delightful seventeen acres are as varied as they are beautiful, with trees, graceful hills, inspired plantings, and several lily ponds complete with shimmering carp. There is a public parking lot located on the southeast corner of Robinson & Reno Avenues. This facility is in the immediate vicinity of the Cox Convention & Ford Event Centers and two blocks West of Bricktown.  Click here for a detailed description and map
Oklahoma City Zoo Lake

This is a small lake and park with mostly oak trees plus several brushy hillsides. This is a public park and the gate is open from dawn to dusk. Ample parking is available in several locations on the south side of the lake with convenient access from I-35. Drive the loop road and bird from your car or walk along the lake from any parking location on the south side of the lake. Be sure to check the vine covered, overgrown, brushy hillsides carefully. Some birds to be found are Swamp and other wintering Sparrows, Towhees, Winter Wrens and Marsh Wrens. Click here for a detailed description and map

Rose Lake Rose "Lake" is not really a lake but an area prone to flooding if there has been sufficient rain which floods the adjoining bottomland fields.  In spring and late July through September, if flooding has occurred, shorebirding is fantastic and hundreds of herons and egrets may be feeding. Over thirty species of shorebirds visit Rose Lake every year when conditions are favorable. During years when water covers it for longer periods cattail growth has attracted nesting coots, Common Moorhens, Pled-billed Grebes, and Least Bitterns. During migration hundreds of Yellow-headed Blackbirds and dozens of Bobolinks may be seen in nearby fields along NW 63rd and NW 50th streets. Click here for a detailed description and map
Stanley Draper Lake A wide range of habitats - lake, lake shore, marshes, dense “crosstimber” oak forest, woodland edges, roadcuts, roadside and other cut-over brushy areas, open grassland and thickets of Sand Plum, Poison-Ivy, Wild Blackberry and Sumac - attracts an exciting variety of resident and migrating birds. Click here for a detailed description and map
Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge

This marshland and the adjoining heavily wooded swamp along the North Canadian River for a little over 2 miles have been designated as a wildlife refuge. The refuge lies just north of Lake Overholser, north of US 66-US 270. Nesting Prothonotary Warblers and Wood Ducks are found in the several ponds along the river roads. Late summer concentrations of Double-crested Cormorants may number in the hundreds. When water levels are low, wading birds including White-faced Ibis and rarely such southern visitors as the White Ibis, Roseate Spoonbill, and Olivaceous Cormorant are seen. Click here for a detailed description and map

Sutton Wilderness Area

This urban wilderness is managed by Norman Parks and Recreation. There are small artificial lakes with a bordering variety of evergreen and deciduous trees. The surrounding fields have been planted to native grasses and forbs. Spring is the best time to visit the area. Migrating warblers, late wintering sparrows, and newly arriving nesting birds are to be expected. Painted Buntings are numerous. Click here for a detailed description and map

Thunderbird Lake This is perhaps the best natural birding area left around Norman and the last known sighting of the Black-capped Vireo in this area, not to be expected now. Birding is good any time of the year and early morning is the best time to visit. Click here for a detailed description and map
Yukon City Park Yukon City Park, Chisholm Trail Park and Freedom Trail Playground are interconnected recreation facilities on approx. 100 acres in Yukon just north of I-40. The Copeland Nature Trail runs along a heavily wooded creek on the east side of the park. The trail includes tall cottonwoods and several patches of dense trees with heavy undergrowth. There is a gravel trail through the woods on the south end of the park. The north end of Copeland Trail is dirt or grass and follows along the 5-acre Mulvey's Pond. There is also a wide dirt trail along Spring Creek that goes north from the dam. This trail runs north across open fields to Chisholm Trail Park.  Click here for a detailed description and map

 

Northwest Oklahoma

Location

Description

Arnett Area One of the birder's most sought after species is the Lesser Prairie Chicken and the Arnett area provides a good location in which to find it. Other specialties of the area are the Wild Turkey, longspurs, and the Virginia Rail. The longspurs can be found most readily in the more open areas north and also west of Arnett. The order of frequency of occurrence is Lapland, Chestnut-collared, and McCown's. Click here for a detailed description and map
Black Mesa Area

The Black Mesa area is special place that lies in the very shadow of the Rocky Mountains. There is a decidedly western influence in its biota. Softer sedimentary rock composing the mesas has eroded more rapidly than the overlying igneous layers. As a result, flat-topped buttes, wandering ridges, and isolated peaks have been formed that jut skyward from their buttresses of accumulated soil. The birdlife is western, with many species seen nowhere else in Oklahoma. Just a few of the many unique species are Scaled Quail, Black-throated, Lark Cassin's and Brewer's (M) sparrows, Say's Phoebe (S), Cassin's finch, Sage and Curve-billed thrashers, Lark Bunting, Lazuli Bunting, Western Tanager, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Cassin's Kingbird, Townsend's Solitaire, Mountain Bluebird, Clark's Nutcracker, Black-billed Magpie, Scrub, Pinyon and Stellar's Jay, Green-tailed and Brown towhees, Common Poorwill, Western Screech-Owl, Lewis's Woodpecker, Ladder-backed Woodpecker, Western Wood-Pewee, and Lesser Goldfinch.  Click here for a detailed description and map

Boise City Sewage Ponds The only permanent source of water for many miles about, these small lakes may be reached by driving north of the Townsman Motel in eastern Boise City. Mixed flocks of shorebirds are abundant in season and all should be closely scrutinized for rarities. During migration, look for Black-bellied Plovers, Wilson's Phalaropes, American Avocets, Black and Forster's terns. Some rarities include Red Knot, Red-necked and Red phalaropes, and Black-necked Stilt. Flying about and skimming over the water in company with the more common swallows might be a few Tree Swallows, an occasional Chimney Swift, or even a Violet-green Swallow. An infrequent wader and a few gulls (watch for California Gull) may be observed. Waterfowl are numerous and diverse. See Black Mesa Area for detailed description and maps
Byron Fish Hatchery Byron Hatchery Watchable Wildlife Area (WWA) and showcases three different habitats in a 40-acre area. The area includes a 1/2-mile self-guided trail through a cat-tail marsh, forested swamp and restored mid-grass prairie. The trail contains informational signs, observation blinds and piers to get visitors closer to wildlife. Other features designed to attract wildlife include bat houses, chimney swift tower, a barn owl nest house and a bluebird trail. Look for ducks, shorebirds, and waders in and around the ponds. Listen for Marsh Wrens in spring if there are cattails around the edges. Both Marbled and Hudsonian godwits have been seen in the spring as well as Cinnamon Teal. Click here for a detailed description and map
Chester Route

The 25-mile route follows country roads north to near the Cimarron River. There are sage covered sandhills at the beginning of the route and "gyp hills canyon country" in the central and northern parts. Birds seen include Eastern and Western kingbirds, Lark and Grasshopper sparrows, Turkey Vultures, Eastern and Western meadowlarks, Mississippi Kites, with Painted Buntings, Eastern Phoebes, Mockingbirds, and Cardinals in the canyons. In this area listen for Cassin's Sparrows and Rufous-crowned Sparrows, and hybrid Lazuli-Indigo buntings may be seen. Click here for a detailed description and map

Dover & Dover Marsh Coming Soon
Four Canyon Preserve This Nature Conservancy Four Canyon Preserve encompasses 4,000 acres of mixed-grass prairie, rugged canyons, and floodplain along the Canadian River in southern Ellis County. Scenic prairie ridges traverse the landscape, dissected by deep chinquapin oak-lined canyons draining to the river. These prairies provide habitat for a number of rare grassland birds, such as Cassin's sparrow and Swainson's hawk, and additional species of concern including reptiles like the Texas horned lizard, as well as numerous state-rare plants. The cool, wooded canyons stand in contrast to the surrounding prairies, and provide habitat for birds like red-bellied woodpecker and painted bunting. The Canadian River on the preserve provides habitat for the federally endangered least tern, the threatened Arkansas River shiner, as well as stopover habitat for migratory shorebirds including the sandhill crane. Click here for a detailed description and map
Great Salt Plains The most unusual feature of this refuge is the vast stretch of salt flats extending westward from the Salt Fork of the Arkansas River. The barren wasteland belies the presence of any life, yet the Snowy Plover and the American Avocet are abundant nesters. The Least Tern sometimes shares nesting areas with the plover. Upwards of 50,000 geese and ducks find shelter on the Great Salt Plains Reservoir and feed on surrounding grain fields or on fresh water ponds. Flocks of migrating Sandhill Cranes have included one or two Whooping Cranes as they rest enroute to Aransas Refuge. A sight to remember is hundreds of White Pelicans circling over the Sand Creek Bay before settling on the water. Although it is designed as a refuge for migratory birds, primarily waterfowl, the area has also become a haven for non-game wildlife. In the eastern sections of the refuge are riparian woodlands and brush, ponds and small marshes. Click here for a detailed description and map
Lookout Route

This is high country, the elevation at Buffalo, 18 miles to the west, being 1,791 feet. The sage on most of the land has been removed and the more level land planted in wheat. Most of the farm houses have been abandoned. Ranch roads are maintained with tax funds and are considered public. The route begins at the entrance of a ranch with a cattle-guard gate south of the covered picnic table on SH 34, about 3.5 miles south of the Kansas line. Some birds to be seen in this area are Horned Larks, Mourning Doves, Lark Sparrows, Cassin's Sparrow, Grasshopper Sparrows, Burrowing Owls, Ring-necked Pheasants, Western Meadowlarks, Swainson's Hawks and Mississippi Kites. Click here for a detailed description and map

Optima National Wildlife Refuge Located in the middle of the Oklahoma panhandle, the 4,333-acre Optima National Wildlife Refuge is made up of central mixed-grass prairie and wooded bottomland on the Coldwater Creek arm of Optima Reservoir.    Because of its important habitats, Optima is a migratory stopover and summer home to many species of songbirds and raptors. Click here for a detailed description and map
Selman Ranch

The Selman Guest Ranch is located in Buffalo, Oklahoma. The ranch is a 4th generation working ranch that also provides wildlife viewing for guests of their overnight accommodations. The ranch has 14,000 acres of mixed grass prairie, eight miles of creek bottom and an excellent bird habitat with a sand and salt flat nesting area. Many species can be viewed, from Snowy plovers, Least Terns and Lesser Prairie Chicken, to many migratory birds such as a large variety of hawks and falcons and occasionally Golden Eagles and Bald Eagles. You will also see Cassin's, Rufous-crowned, Field, Grasshopper, and Harris's Sparrow. Prime areas available for birding include cottonwood gallery forest along several perennial prairie streams, a several hundred acre salt flat along the Cimarron River, cattail marshes, ponds, gypsum buttes, cliffs, mesquite flats. Click here for a detailed description and map

Washita National Wildlife Refuge

This 8,200 acre refuge is positioned on the northern portion of Foss Reservoir and has one of the largest waterfowl concentrations in Oklahoma. The diverse habitats that make up the refuge attract over 250 species of birds and other wildlife including coyotes, white-tailed deer, raccoons, and black-tail prairie dogs. Also found on the refuge are three endangered species: the American bald eagle, the whooping crane, and the interior least tern. Click here for a detailed description and map

 

Northeast Oklahoma

Location

Description

Carlisle Cove In the cove there are oak and hickory wooded hills with thick undergrowth and a rugged Corps of Engineers controlled shoreline The sparsely settled area permits good roadside birding. The cove is 85 miles from Tulsa. Special features of the area include Bald Eagles in winter; Black Vultures in summer; all woodpeckers the year round except the Red-cockaded Woodpecker; good warblers during spring migration; occasional Roadrunners; and good Eastern Bluebird populations. This area provides good birding all year. Click here for a detailed description and map
Chouteau Wetlands The Chouteau Wetlands Unit of McClellan-Kerr Wildlife Management Area is an area of low deciduous forest, interspersed with some agriculture fields, slow flowing streams, and wetlands areas. In both Spring and Fall, migrating warblers use the trees and brushy fence rows. There is good habitat for winter ducks, depending on hunting pressure. Waders are frequent, but there is little shorebird habitat. Click here for a detailed description and map
Claremore Lake The Claremore Lake Trail is a 2.1 mile segment of the overall Claremore Citywide Trail system. The trail follows the west shore of Claremore Lake. Click here for a detailed description and map
Copan Lake Copan Lake, an impoundment of the Little Caney River, lies north of Bartlesville and just west of the town of Copan in northern Washington County. A variety of birds can be viewed in and around the lake. Click here for a detailed description and map
Deep Fork Bottoms (Chandler-Stroud Area) The Deep Fork Bottoms as considered here are the approximately 40 square miles of the flood prone areas of the Deep Fork River in Lincoln County south of I 44 from Warwick on the west to Stroud on the east. South of Chandler there is an open lake to the east of highway 18 where during migration periods bird-watching is exceptionally rewarding. White-faced Ibis, American Bittern, Black-crowned Night-Heron, Double-crested Cormorant, Belted Kingfisher, plus all Oklahoma egrets and herons can be seen here. Unusual records include the Roseate Spoonbill in 1984. Click here for a detailed description and map
Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge The Deep Fork National Wildlife Refuge is located largely in the floodplain of the Deep Fork of the North Canadian River, commonly known as the Deep Fork River. The river that is nearly as deep as it is wide meanders across 34 river miles of the Refuge. Click here for a detailed description and map
Eucha Lake See Spavinaw Lakes Area
Fort Gibson Lake Fort Gibson Lake is truly the place in Oklahoma where east meets west. During spring migration virtually all of the passerines, including some 30 warblers which use the Central Flyway, can be looked for in the wooded hills and creek bottoms which border the lake's east side. Conversely, just across the lake to the west, a prairie habitat prevails and there is a western flavor evident in the avifauna. Click here for a detailed description and map
Grainola-Hardy Area This area is 80% native tall grass prairie with grain fields, ponds, and marshes. The route is broken occasionally with small streams and riparian woodlands or with heavy windbreaks of red cedar on the high plateaus. Prairie-Chickens are numerous and can be observed in morning and evening feeding in grain fields around Grainola from early October through February. After March 1 they can easily be located on their booming grounds in the Hardy area and are not ordinarily seen in grain fields. Click here for a detailed description and map
Greenleaf State Park Greenleaf is one of the state's most scenic parks and has often been the location of the Oklahoma Ornithological Society's spring meeting, held annually in late April or early May. Birds listed during the spring meeting totaled about 125 species including some twenty species of warblers. Click here for a detailed description and map
Hudson Lake This is a fine area for finding warblers, shorebirds and waterfowl in season. A loop road along Spavinaw Creek is a beautiful drive with little traffic, and the birding is excellent. Click here for a detailed description and map
Hulah Lake

During fall, winter, and early spring, fourteen species of birds of prey may be found at the dam site or on the high prairies, some of common occurrence, others classified as uncommon to rare. Numerous shorebirds come to the mud-bar edges of the lake during migration. Included are yellowlegs, dowitchers, snipe; Pectoral, Spotted, Solitary, and Stilt sandpipers, and small peeps. Less common are Willets, American Avocets and Sandhill Cranes (rare). Prairie-Chickens may be seen on high prairie approaches to the dam. Occasionally Smith's and Lapland longspurs, Mountain Bluebirds, and Short-eared Owls can be seen in this same area. Click here for a detailed description and map

Nickel Preserve The Nature Conservancy's J. T. Nickel Family Nature and Wildlife Preserve is the largest privately protected conservation area in the Ozarks. This 15,000-acre landscape rests in eastern Oklahoma's rolling Cookson Hills and overlooks the Illinois River. Spring-fed creeks meander amid a rugged topography of steep slopes and narrow valleys harboring a mosaic of oak-hickory forest, lofty pine woodland, and a diverse mix of savanna, shrubland, and prairie. The preserve provides optimal habitat for a suite of uncommon breeding bird species. Click here for a detailed description and map
Okmulgee Lake Waterfowl at Lake Okmulgee are plentiful during the migration periods and many spend the winter. Birding from the spillway below the dam is best in spring when warblers, vireos, flycatchers, buntings, woodpeckers, and Eastern Bluebirds are here. The Wood Duck, Belted Kingfisher, and Wood Thrush have nested. Click here for a detailed description and map
Osage Hills State Park The park, containing 987 acres, is cut by Sand Creek. While the country is rugged, all primary roads are blacktop and good. The route consists of wooded hillsides and scrubby border along the water's edge, with a variety of habitats. Click here for a detailed description and map
Pathfinder Parkway A 12 mile trail wandering through deep woods, along a river and through the middle of Bartlesville! The Connecticut Warbler was found in this area.  Click here for a detailed description and map
Rogers State Univ. Conservation Education Reserve The Rogers State University Conservation Education Reserve is located on the campus of Rogers State University in Claremore, Oklahoma It is a 120 acre outdoor classroom for students of all ages, to use as a living textbook, to learn the value of conserving our natural resources. Bottomland hardwood, tall-grass prairie and cross timber habitats grace the slopes and lowlands. Students and teachers learn at the Reserve with a hands on approach. Click here for more details
Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge

Nestled in gently rolling foothills of the Ozark Mountains, Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge is home to wildlife as unique as the bald eagle and as elusive as the bobcat. Fertile bottomlands at the confluence of the Arkansas and Canadian Rivers make this east-central Oklahoma refuge a terrific wildlife viewing destination. The largest flocks of snow geese in Oklahoma are her in the winter, as well as Mallards by the thousands along with as gadwall, pintail, teal, wigeon, shoveler and wood ducks. Bald eagles now nest on the Refuge. In winter, you can see numerous eagles roosting in cottonwoods or swooping over the waters in search of fish or waterfowl. Click here for a detailed description and map

Sequoyah State Park Located on the shores of Fort Gibson Lake, there is good birding is good throughout the park. A small nature center is also found in the park.  Click here for a detailed description and map
Skiatook Lake The lake is among the rolling hills of Osage County. The habitat is a combination of large, open mixed-grass prairies and pasture lands, heavily wooded areas including postoak-blackjack forest with large limestone outcroppings and bluffs. Many redbuds may be found especially on or near these limestone bluffs. Click here for a detailed description and map
Sooner Lake Sooner Lake has become one of Oklahoma’s premier birding hotspots. Sooner Lake is a classic prairie reservoir which harbors abundant waterfowl, shorebirds and prairie birds. Click here for a detailed description and map
Spavinaw Lake Area The Spavinaw Lake area has for many years been a choice spot to find eastern warblers in spring migration. On a good day in early May it is possible to find 25 or more species. The abandoned fish hatchery at the north end of Spavinaw are a variety of herons, including American and Least bitterns, Sora and Virginia Rails. In very early spring Sedge Wrens are a possibility. Both the Yellow-throated and the Pine Warbler have been observed in the tall pines. Click here for a detailed description and map
Strayhorn Landing Strayhorn Landing on Lake Tenkiller is a prime location in winter for viewing waterfowl, particularly loons. It is possible to find all four loon species on Lake Tenkiller - Red-throated, Pacific, Yellow-billed and Common. Click here for a detailed description and map
Tallgrass Prairie Preserve The Tallgrass Prairie Preserve is the largest protected remnant of tallgrass prairie left on earth. Since 1989, the Nature Conservancy has proven successful at restoring this fully-functioning portion of the tallgrass prairie ecosystem with the use of about 2500 free-roaming bison and a "patch-burn" model approach to prescribed burning.  Click here for a detailed description and map
Tenkiller Ferry Lake Tenkiller is a prime location in winter for viewing waterfowl, particularly loons. It is possible to find all four loon species on Lake Tenkiller - Red-throated, Pacific, Yellow-billed and Common. The surrounding Cookson hills provide good year-round birding. Click here for a detailed description and map
Zink Ranch A large ranch, north of Sand Springs, including areas of Skiatook Lake. Extensive prairie and woodland areas. Entry is by permission only.

 

Southwest Oklahoma

Location

Description

Clear Creek Lake Area The north end of the lake is exceptionally good for ducks and shorebirds. Other species seen in this area are generally the same as those found at lakes Fuqua and Humphreys. Birding is good on a year-round basis. The 560-acre lake is about 2 miles from Lake Humphreys. Click here for a detailed description and map
Duncan Lake Area

Near the dam of Lake Duncan are fish hatchery ponds with a swampy area where one can find Common Yellowthroats, Lark Sparrows, orioles, Summer Tanagers, White-eyed and Bell's vireos, woodpeckers including Pileated, buntings and flycatchers. In winter search for the Hermit Thrush and Water Pipit. The rocky bluffs on the north lake shore,with many persimmon trees, cottonwoods, and much undergrowth. Rufous-crowned Sparrows can usually be seen during spring, summer and fall. Click here for a detailed description and map

Eldorado Area Several section-line roads lead south toward the Red River's mature riparian woodlands where one may find a variety of southwestern birds not found elsewhere in Oklahoma. Species include Mississippi Kites (S), Harris's Hawks (rare in winter), and Sandhill Cranes After dark in summer Common Poorwills, Scaled Quail, Greater Roadrunners, Golden-fronted and Ladder-backed woodpeckers, Ash-throated Flycatchers (S), Chihuahuan Ravens (S), Tufted (Black-crested) Titmice, Verdins (and nests), Curve-billed Thrashers, Northern (Bullock's) Orioles (S), Swainson's (S), Ferruginous (W), and Rough-legged hawks, Horned Larks, Sprague's Pipits (W), Dickcissels (S), Cassin's (S), Clay-colored (M), and Lark (S) sparrows, Lark Buntings (M,W), Savannah (W), and Grasshopper (S) sparrows, McCown's Longspurs (W), Western Meadowlarks, and Yellow-headed Blackbirds (M), Black-headed Grosbeaks (M), and Lesser Goldfinches (S). Any of the numerous abandoned buildings in the area may harbor Barn-Owls. Click here for a detailed description and map
Fuqua Lake Area In the vicinity of the 1,555-acre lake in the rolling hill country are blackjack oak, cottonwood, pecan and elm trees. Willows are found near the mud flats. On the west side of the lake is pasture land with some cover near the lake shore. Many good birding spots are accessible along the south shore. Click here for a detailed description and map
Hackberry Flats

More than 7,100 acres of former southwest Oklahoma farmland, once one of the nation’s largest Playa Lakes, has now been restored to it’s wetland glory, making Hackberry Flat a premier destination for birders, especially for its high concentrations of shorebirds and waterbirds, including Whooping Cranes. More than 200 species have been identified during surveys, with such rare and uncommon species as the black-necked stilt, stilt sandpiper, and snowy plover being seen. Sheer numbers of birds make this area stand out as one of the best anywhere.  Click here for a detailed description and map

Humphreys Lake

In the vicinity of the lake are tall trees, wooded hillsides, mud flats, creeks and sloughs. Besides the usual birds u ncommon or not usually recorded birds during winter are Pine Siskins, Purple Finches, Yellow-headed Blackbirds, Fox, Savannah, and Vesper sparrows, Common Loon, and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. In spring the list includes American Redstart, Black-and-white Warbler, Louisiana Waterthrush, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Nashville warbler, and night-herons.  Click here for a detailed description and map

Kizziar's Feedlot Prairie Dog Town Request permission to enter the dogtown. Follow the pasture road that winds WNW to the dogtown. Species to look for: Swainson's (S), Ferruginous (W), and Rough-legged (W) hawks, Scaled Quail, Upland Sandpipers (M,W), McCown's Longspurs (W), Western Meadowlarks, Yellow-headed Blackbirds (M), Curve-billed Thrasher (S) and Burrowing Owls. Click here for a detailed description and map
Quartz Mountain State Park The park lies in the valley of the North Fork of the Red River where the river was dammed to create the 6,260-acre Lake Altus. Granite buttes and peaks of the Quartz Mountains rise above the plains eastward to the Wichitas. In spring a profusion of wildflowers creates a colorful display along the hillsides, with small outcroppings of the red granite accentuating the vivid shades of blue, red and gold. Bird species on the trail are limited but birders should find Rufous-crowned Sparrow and Lazuli Bunting. Lesser Goldfinches are found in several locations in the park and Painted Buntings are common. Click here for a detailed description and map
Red Rock Canyon State Park

The park occupies about a mile and one-quarter of the north end of one of Caddo County's famous canyons. Elm, box elder, sugar maple, willows, and oak trees along the steep red sandstone walls. The fairly dry east and west rims of the canyon are partially covered by juniper, post, and blackjack oaks. Cliff and Rough-winged Swallows nest here. Beside more common species, in previous years Black-capped Vireo, Lesser Goldfinch, and Rufous-crowned Sparrow were nesting species. During migration several warblers are found here, and late fall and winter may possibly bring Mountain Bluebirds and Townsend's Solitaires. October weather turns the remaining sugar maples to a beautiful display of reds, oranges, and yellow, well worth a special trip to this unique area. Click here for a detailed description and map

Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge

The 59,020 acre Refuge, established in 1901, is a remnant mixed grass prairie. The largest breeding population of the endangered Black-capped vireo in the State of Oklahoma occurs on the refuge. The Refuge provides habitat for large native grazing animals including American bison and Rocky Mountain Elk. Texas longhorn cattle also share the Refuge as a cultural and historical legacy species. Click here for a detailed description and map

 

Southeast Oklahoma

Location

Description

Beaver's Bend State Park

In a state blessed with a variety of beautiful state parks, Beaver's Bend is considered by many to be the crown jewel in Oklahoma's parks. Located on a cypress-lined bend of Mountain Fork River, just below the dam of Broken Bow Reservoir, and nestled among the pine-clad hills of the Ouachita Mountains, Beaver's Bend State Park has much to offer the birder throughout the year. Click here for a detailed description and map

Clayton-Sardis Area

The Clayton area is within the Ouachita Mountains and is typical of the oak-shortleaf pine biotic region that dominates southeastern Oklahoma. Located in a valley between the Jackfork Mountains on the west, the Winding Stair Mountains on the northeast, and the Kiamichi Mountains on the east, the area is a mix of forest lands and open rangelands with cattle ranches. There are three excellent birding areas nearby that are open to the public: Sardis Reservoir, Clayton Lake and Recreation Area, and the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation Pushmataha Game Management Area. Click here for a detailed description and map

Chickasaw National Recreation Area The “Peaceful Valley of Rippling Waters‿ appropriately describes Chickasaw National Recreation Area, as it is known for its many mineral springs, cool water, flora, fauna, and wildlife. Here one’s mind may wander back in time to when the early American Indian came to this area to rest, relax at the water’s edge, and hunt for their food from the abundant wildlife. This area has significant geological and hydrological features and lies in the transitional ecotones of the Eastern deciduous forest and the Western prairies. Click here for a detailed description and map
Little River National Wildlife Refuge

This refuge preserves bottomland hardwood habitat along Little River for the benefit of migrating and wintering waterfowl. It is located in the floodplain along the north side of Little River and is characterized by low, wet habitat with oak and hickory forest and old oxbows and sloughs interspersed through the area. Most of the Refuge is forested with bottomland species. The refuge is known for the rare Swainson's warbler, the only known nesting location in Oklahoma. Flycatchers, swallows, vireos, and at least 31 species of warblers are all neotropical migrants on the refuge. Click here for a detailed description and map

McCurtain County Route McCurtain County in the southeast corner offers the bird-finder several habitats found nowhere else in the state. Much of the flora and fauna here are actually more typical of Louisiana than one would expect to see in Oklahoma. Click here for a detailed description and map
McCurtain County Wilderness Area

Situated in the Kiamichi-Ouachita Mountain region of southeastern Oklahoma the McCurtain County Wilderness Area is one of the last sizeable expanses of old growth oak-pine forest in the state. The Wilderness Area terrain is characterized by a series of steep and narrow wooded ridges. At least 110 bird species have been recorded within the wilderness area boundaries. The Red-cockaded Woodpecker, a federally endangered species, has its last toehold in Oklahoma within this wilderness area. Click here for a detailed description and map

Pontotoc Ridge Preserve This Nature Conservancy preserve is a 2,900-acre crosstimbers landscape in south-central Oklahoma and holds bottomland forests, oak savannas (essential for migratory birds like painted buntings), mixed-grass and tallgrass prairies, springs and cool running streams. This untilled landscape has proven to be a regional hot spot of butterfly diversity, boasting over 90 species documented at the preserve to date. Whether it's cactus, bluestem or mountain boomers, Pontotoc Ridge Preserve is an excellent example of Oklahoma's ruggedly beautiful lands.  Click here for a detailed description and map
Red Slough Red Slough has become one of the hottest recreational destinations for birders and other wildlife enthusiasts in the United States. The management style employed by the Red Slough management team has made it possible for the extraordinary diversity of birdlife to occur at Red Slough. It is not uncommon for many birdwatchers to see more than one lifebird at Red Slough in a day's trip. To date, 292 bird species have been sighted and documented within the Red Slough Wetland Reserve Project. Many of these species found at Red Slough do not regularly occur elsewhere in Oklahoma or are rare to the state. Birdwatchers have likened this area to the Gulf Coast habitats of Louisiana, Texas, and Florida. Species such as purple gallinules, least bittern, common moorhens, least terns, tricolored heron, white ibis, neotropic cormorants, anhingas, black-bellied whistling ducks, king rails, roseate spoonbills, and wood storks are regular summer residents and/or breeders. Some rarities seen include least grebe, glossy ibis, crested caracara, Harris' hawk, trumpeter swan, tundra swan, swallow-tailed kites, mottled ducks, piping plovers, black rail, sage thrasher, and common ground-doves. In the fall, good numbers of yellow rails stage here. Thirty-four species of shorebirds are known to occur. Click here for a detailed description and map
Texoma Lake See Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge
Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge lies on the upper Washita arm of Lake Texoma. The fresh water impoundments, creeks and river provide 5,500 acres of open water and marsh. The remaining lands vary from seasonally-flooded basins and flats to gently rolling native grasslands that grade into dense oak-hickory-elm woodlands. Together the water, marsh, and farmlands serve as the primary roosting, loafing, and feeding areas for the refuge's wintering waterfowl which may include up to 45,000 geese (primarily Canadas) and 15,000 ducks (mostly Mallards). Click here for a detailed description and map

Outside Oklahoma

Devil's Den State Park, Arkansas

Devil's Den offers residents and visitors to eastern Oklahoma an opportunity to see several eastern woodland species rarely encountered in our area. A variety of woodland birds can be seen in the park, especially during migration, but perhaps the most exciting birds are the variety of warblers. At least 14 species nest in the park. There is an excellent chance of seeing a Louisiana Waterthrush feeding along the swifter portions of Lee Creek. Yellow-throated, Northern Parula, Cerulean, American Redstart, and Black-and-white warblers may be found in the treetops. Closer to the ground, the Common Yellowthroat, Hooded, Yellow-breasted Chat, Ovenbird, Kentucky, and Prairie warblers can be encountered. With luck, one may see the Worm-eating and Blue-winged warblers. In April and May migrating warblers in breeding plumage are abundant, most notably the Magnolia, Golden-winged, Blackburnian, Mourning, and Black-throated Green. Click here for a detailed description and map

Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, Kansas

Coming Soon

Cheyenne Bottom, Kansas

Coming Soon